Visiting southeast Asia and Asean countries for vacation travel places to go nightlife & retirement and beautiful pictures
Travel in southeast Asia Guide / ASEAN currently the major style show in the region is on here. 
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Batavia today Jakarta

Southeast Asian History

Southeast Asian Colonial History

Southeast Asian History
Before tourism started in southeast Asia with Travel local people made money by trading with foreigners.

Major goods were spices and gemstones plus pearls and after tin. Yes, and many were pirates which even hasn't ended yet. At that time they were after anything of value today they steal whole ships such as diesel tanker and other

Batavia was the main settlement of the Dutch East Indies and the location corresponds to the present Jakarta. The picture shows the harbor scene in 16xx  at the time it was strongly in the grip of the Dutch. The picture at right side shows the harbor of Batavia at the above indicated time.

Myanmar History in southeast Asia

In 300 A.D. the power of the Bagan kingdom had spent itself in a great degree owing, as the Burma's believe, to the drain of the temple-building.

But the force of the religion was unabated the country fell a prey to Shan invaders, who snatched the dominion for nearly two hundred years but failed to consolidate it, splitting up into principalities like those of their native hills. The weakness of allowed the Mon power to develop.

The sixteenth century saw the rise of Pegu - Bago and the establishment of a shifting empire over. Exhausted.. by wars, Pegu - Bago in turn declined and lay at the mercy of Siam ( Yodaya) when Paung (Taung - ngu) came to the rescue. In the seventeenth century, the Peguan dynasty brought the Mutt empire to its zenith, from which it waned in the eighteenth. Towards the middle of the latter century, the Emmaus under Alaiung Paya rose against the Mum garrisons, overthrew Pegu and finally established the empire of  Arakan - Rakhine was incorporated, Siam was subjugated and made tributary for a time.


          

History on the west coast

Photos
The empire directed its ambition to the west. Manipur was overrun and the Arakanese pretensions in 1571 the country was in a state of chaos.

High officials plotted against King Mong Ph along. Astrologers advised the king to build the  Htukkant Thein Temple with the help of the plotters as well as governors, landlords, and common people. They acted according to a saying common at that time, “when the city is worn, support its ceiling.” The temple was built in a 70 meter by 80-meter platform. The structure is built of stone blocks with brick pagodas on top of the hall and on the four corners.

Inside the temple, there are two pavements with many images and carvings picturing the various donors. It is a very interesting collection of different costumes and ornaments. Sixty-four varieties of coiffure, forty different head-dresses, twenty different bracelets, eighty-one rings, sixteen types of pendants and various other body decorations are a creative showcase, read more.

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About ASEAN and Thailand History

About Thailand history considering the social, cultural, literary, and urban life of the past.

Dealing with an earlier time when the Thai world functioned as a multitude of units stretched across the Mekong region and down the Chao Phraya Valley complex, with extensions east into the uplands of the Red and Black Rivers and west to the Upper Salween, Irrawaddy, and the Brahmaputra where the Tai-Ahom, the least known of the Tai peoples, live.

Much of the region is mountainous with average altitudes ranging from 10,000 feet in the Yunnan Plateau, where few Tai live, dropping to 6,000 to 3,000 feet in the Shan plateau, along the Red and Black rivers, and some areas in the Lao Plateau, decreasing still further, from 3,000 to 600 feet along the Lower Upper Mekong, the Upper Chao Phraya Valley complex (the Ping, Wang, Yom, and Nan rivers) and the Phetchabun Range.
Phuket Tin Mining
The main Chao Phraya Valley , the Khorat Plateau, and the Middle Mekong Basin are below 600 feet in altitude. The Mekong River is one of the world's longest, running for 2,795 miles from Tibet, through Southwestern China, and on to form the modern boundaries of Burma and Laos, then Thailand and Laos. When it reaches modern Cambodia and Vietnam it begins to divide, creating new channels, as it moves still farther south and east to exit in the South China Sea. Because of the length of the Mekong and the diversity of peoples who live in its basin.
The Cherngtalay main street a typical Chinese tin mining town on Phuket Island in the late 19th Century.

The Thai peoples

Penang historic village
Among them, the Tai-Ahom, Tai-Shan, dun (Khuen), Tai-Lue (or Tai-Lu), Tai-Lao, Red Tai, White Tai, Black Tai, and the Tai-Siamese (Central Thai).

They occupy a large region today covers northeastern India, southern China, northeastern Myanmar Thailand, Laos, and northwestern Vietnam. When the Thai first appeared in Southeast Asia, they were in the process of moving West across the uplands and south along the many rivers of Southwestern China and Mainland Southeast Asia . Their life has been influenced by the location of the regions they occupy and the topography of those regions.

The Thai live in mountain valleys and lowland plains which historically supported more fragmented and small-scale politics than the much larger lowland river basins. In the upland valleys, the Tai have often lived in close association with non-Tai groups such as the Sino-Tibetan, (Kachin, Lisu, Lahu, Akha, Hmong, and Mien) and the Austroasiatic Mon-Khmer, Khmu, and Lawa, along with some migrants from China who were most likely to settle in trading centers.

Brief Historical Survey of Siam

The earliest references to the Tai are to "Proto-Tai," a name given to an early language spoken by some inhabitants of Southeastern China.

During the early centuries of this era, growing pressure from the Chinese and Vietnamese caused the northern group of Tai speakers to separate from a southern group that lived near the Black River. It was this southern group that moved west through the mountain passes and south down the Mekong, Chao Phraya, and Salween rivers from perhaps the seventh to the thirteenth centuries. Their expansion was slow as villages split with some of their inhabitants moving into new areas. In most cases, these areas were already occupied by earlier residents, usually Austroasiatics. retaining much of their basic culture—language, animistic spirits, political and social systems, and agricultural practices the Fai through association and intermarriage with earlier residents absorbed other cultural values, among the most important being Indian theories of law and the Theravada school of Buddhism. Those who settled further south, in closer contact with the Mons and the Khmer, eventually adopted more elaborate laws, customs, and political systems.

Finally, in the late eighteenth century, one Tai group, the Siamese or Central Thai of Thonburi and Bangkok, became the most dominant of the Tai peoples. But earlier, in the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth centuries, Tai societies in the Shan States on the Shan Plateau, Sipsong Parma in the north along the Mekong River, Lan Na in the Upper Chao Phraya complex, and Lan Xang along the Middle Mekong thrived. During this period, the primary external influence in the region was that of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) of China. While the Ming did, at times, mount military assaults on the Tai region, their attacks were few and usually repulsed. Instead, the real importance of the Ming contacts lay in the interaction of trade and tribute between the Northern Tai centers and the Ming.

The Tai centers sent numerous tribute missions to the Ming court and were rewarded with valuable gifts that included silver, silk, and paper money. The Ming desired the goods that the Tai region had to offer: precious gems; gold and silver; such metals as iron, copper, tin, and lead; forest products like benzoin and lac; spices; salt; cowries; ceramics; and other goods. The spread of Theravada Buddhism, especially after the arrival of the New Ceylon (Sihala) sect, contributed to economic growth as the demands for ritual objects increased. Local tributary and gift exchanges involved the Shan States, Keng Tung, Sipsong Parma, Lan Na, and Lan Xang. In spite of local conflicts that occurred, the active economy, trade in all directions—the Tai centers were on the main overland route between Ming China and the rest of Mainland Southeast Asia—and the spread of Theravada Buddhism made the period from the fourteenth century to the early sixteenth a golden era for the region. This prosperity came to an end with the expansion of Burma.

The Burmese conquered the Shan centers and then moved east towards Lan Na, Sipsong Panna, and Lan Xang. In 1563 Lan Xang moved its capital from Luang Prabang to Vientiane to avoid the Burmese. After 1598 Sipsong Panna had to send tribute to both China and Burma. While Lan Xang was too distant to be subject to permanent Burmese occupation, Lan Na and Sipsong Palma were not able to escape and 

Thailand History

Thailand Photos
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After the Tin age came over then Malaya and Siam

In the19th Century there was a huge upsurge in demand for tin from Phuket south Thailand and also from today Malaysia.

The island's tin had previously been used mainly in China in religious ceremonies when hammered paper-thin, tin burns brightly. In India and the West, it was used in making bronze, gun metal (bronze and zinc) for maritime cannons, pewter and also as speculum for mirrors. During the Napoleonic Wars, non-corrosive tin was first used in cans for keeping military rations and this use soon spread and cans became popular for food storage among the general public in America, Europe, Britain and its colonies.

The main demand for tin grew with the Industrial Revolution when it started being extensively used for tin plating, a technique for coating steel or iron with non-corrosive tin to prevent rusting. Tin plating was used for cooking utensils, ships, trains and railway lines, roofing material, bridges, nails, oil drums and more.


Just for any steel or iron that was exposed to the elements. Tinplate output in Europe increased by 700 percent in the 19 Century. The greatest boom in demand for Phuket's tin, however, started after 1853 when Britain abolished the high import tariffs that had previously protect, its tin mine, in Cornwall. Tin imports to Britain from the cheaper peninsula increased from 4,000 tons in  185o to 85,000 tons in 1870.
International relevant history of ASEAN
Photos
There was already long time interaction between the Malay Sultanates and Arabs plus Chinese and Indian traders.

But the whole really started when Portuguese Spanish and British ships moved into the waters of the today ASEAN island world. 
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